WE WILL NOT BE GIVING LEPTO VACCINE TO OUR DOGS OR INCLUDE IT IN OUR FIRST SET OF PUPPY VACCINATIONS.


READ ABOUT TITER TESTING, NEXT BOX DOWN.

PLEASE RESEARCH THIS VACCINE BEFORE GIVING IT TO YOUR BOXER AND TALK TO YOUR VET ABOUT THE PROS AND CONS, ASK IF THERE HAVE BEEN ANY RECENT CASES IN YOUR AREA, THIS VACCINE IS NOT CONSIDERED A CORE VACCINE.

Vaccine Reactions: What’s Normal and What’s Not After Your Pet Is Vaccinated

 Normal Vaccine Reactions Which May Be Observed in Dogs and Cats

Lorie Huston, DVM

When a vaccine is administered to your pet, it stimulates his immune system. It may be easy to think of vaccination as a routine and innocuous procedure. However, by their very nature, vaccines create an inflammatory response in your pet’s body. As a result, they are actually far from innocuous and can cause reactions which may range from mild and unnoticeable to severe and life-threatening.

Some pets may experience no symptoms at all or symptoms so mild that they go unnoticed after vaccination. However, mild symptoms of inflammation are not unusual.

  • It is not unusual for a pet to become sluggish and/or lethargic after vaccination.
  • Recently vaccinated pets may experience some soreness and stiffness.
  • A mild fever may be present for 24-48 hours after vaccination.
  • Some pets may experience a lack of appetite for a day or two after vaccines are administered.

These reactions are generally not considered to be cause for alarm.

More Serious Vaccination Reactions Seen in Pets

One of the more serious reactions that can occur in your pet after vaccination is an allergic reaction. Symptoms of an allergic reaction include:

  • hives
  • facial swelling
  • nausea and/or vomiting
  • shock
  • sudden death

If you observe hives or facial swelling in your dog or cat after he has received a vaccination, you should contact your veterinarian immediately for instructions. Antihistimines are frequently administered to halt the reaction.

Vomiting may be a symptom of an allergic reaction or may be a symptom of a less serious issue, such as car sickness or anxiety. Pets that are vomiting after a vaccination should be observed carefully. If in doubt, contact your veterinarian for instructions.

Vaccination reactions may occur immediately after the vaccine or within 48 hours after the vaccine is administered, depending on the type of allergic reaction.

Other Vaccination Reactions

Other complications can also occur as a result of vaccinations.

  • Vaccination sarcomas are a specific type of cancer that occurs at the site of vaccination. These growths are most often seen in cats and have been associated with the rabies and feline leukemia vaccinations in particular. Adjuvanted vaccines are thought to be more likely to result in vaccination sarcomas than those that are non-adjuvanted.
  • Kidney disease and immune-related disease have also been associated with vaccinations in pets.

What does this mean for your pet? It does not mean that you should forego vaccinations for your pet completely. In some cases, the risk of vaccination may be far less than the risk that your pet may develop the disease itself. However, it does mean that you and your veterinarian should consider the risks and benefits of each vaccination before administering the vaccine.

How often your pet needs to be vaccinated depends on the type of vaccination. Some vaccines need to be given yearly, others only need to be administered every three years. Most vaccinations require an initial vaccination series of two or more vaccines at predetermined intervals. Your veterinarian can help you establish an individualized vaccination schedule tailored to fit your pet’s needs.

About Lorie Huston, DVM

Lorie Huston is an accomplished veterinarian, an award winning blogger, a talented author and a certified veterinary journalist. She is available for writing assignments, blogging and social media consultation, and SEO strategy.

 

YOUR PUPPY'S FIRST ROUND OF VACCINATIONS - WEEK 8

THESE SHOULD BE GIVEN BY THE SELLER BEFORE YOU PICK UP YOUR PUPPY.

One the most imperative and confusing responsibilities in caring for your puppy is making sure he gets the right vaccines at the right time. There is controversy nowadays about whether or not your adult dogs need every vaccine every year (except for Rabies which is required). But with puppies, getting their rounds of vaccines is crucial.

For instance, if a puppy catches Parvo, he has less than a 20% chance of recovery. So, put your pup's vaccine dates on your schedule and send yourself reminders.

This tip has a list of necessary vaccines for the first round and further tips will cover the next two rounds. Vets and local laws differ a bit about exactly what to give when so use these tips as guidelines and follow your vet's advice. The vaccines to give at this age are 1. Distemper 2. Parvo and 3. Corona 

There are rarely side effects to vaccines but there are a few serious ones that you should look out for:

  1. Swelling of face, neck, head or body.
  2. Loss of consciousness.
  3. Seizures.
  4. Hives, or large swellings anywhere on the body.
  5. Difficulty breathing.
  6. Disorientation or poor co-ordination.

It is important to keep your puppy from any situation with multiple dogs or unknown dogs until he's had his third round of boosters. At the least, keep him away from other canines for five days after his vaccines, as it takes that long for them to start working. Ignoring this rule could expose your puppy to something like the aforementioned Parvo and have deadly consequences.

While it's tough to make all those vet appointments with a new puppy, just think of it as insurance against illness and assurance of a healthy puppy.

YOUR PUPPY'S SECOND ROUND OF VACCINATIONS - WEEK 12

It may seem like yesterday when you took your pup in for his first round of vaccines but it's time again to make a trip to the vet. The second round of vaccines is as important as the first. Your puppy needs the full three rounds to ensure he is safe against illnesses such as Distemper, which is often fatal. If your puppy does get Distemper, excellent vet care is essential and signs of neurological control such as seizures are hopeful indications of a recovery. But better to get to the vet now than take a chance.

In the second round of vaccines, your pup is less likely to develop serious side effects. However, be on the lookout for lesser side effects such as:

  1. Shaking
  2. Vomiting
  3. Diarrhea

Call your vet if any of these last more than 24 hours.

The vaccines your puppy should be getting are:

  • Distemper
  • Parvo
  • Corona

Always follow your vet's guidelines, as different localities have different schedules. And remember to keep your puppy away from other dogs for at least five days and preferably until after the third round of vaccines. This is a great time for puppies to socialize with new humans, however, in order to keep them open to new beings in their environment.

This is also the time to start worm checks and to start Heartworm prevention. You can help your vet by looking for worms in your puppy's stool. Do not start Heartworm prevention without talking to your vet. It is important that a Heartworm test be done first and that the correct dose is given to your pup. You're well on your way to having a healthy puppy!

 

YOUR PUPPIES THIRD ROUND OF VACCINATIONS - WEEK 16           

 Once again it's time to get your puppy to the vet for his vaccinations. The good news is this is the last round of puppy vaccines. Unless you have some problems, you can stay out of that sterile waiting room for months. It is essential to finish his vaccines with this round because, if you don't, you're undoing all the good the first two rounds provided. One of the biggest misconceptions is that one booster is adequate when, in fact, your puppy is not fully protected until all rounds are finished.

http://www.dogster.com/

RABIES VACCINE

Opinions vary on when this vaccine should be administered, please check with your veterinarian. Personally, I would give it separately after the last round of puppy vaccinations. 

                                   TITER TESTING

The new train of thought is taking blood for an annual titer test, to check a dog’s level of immune defenses, should replace the habit of vaccinating dogs annually whether or not they need it.

TITER TESTING

             (SHOULD I GIVE THE LEPTO VACCINE?)                                                                                                                                               Leptospirosis Vaccination

 

Leptospirosis Vaccination
By Christie Keith

Lepto is, for a variety of reasons, a vaccine where the risk vs benefit analysis changes tremendously from case to case.

First, lepto vaccine causes more adverse reactions than any other canine vaccine.

Second, there are many, many strains of lepto, known as "serovars," but there is no cross-protection among lepto serovars (as there is among parvo strains, for instance). A dog can be immune to one serovar of lepto and have no protection at all from another.

To make that worse, there are only four available vaccine serovars of leptospirosis: L. Canicola, L. Gripophytosa, L. Icterohemorrhagiae, and L.Pomona. However, there are two more that are causing disease in dogs, L.Autumnalis and L. Bratislava, for which we have no vaccines.

Fourth (and this is a problem that lepto immunity shares with all bacterial immunity, natural or from vaccines), immunity to bacteria is only temporary. This is why you can get strep throat (a bacteria) over and over, but only get measles (a virus) once. So the immunity will always wear off over time, sometimes in less than a year. This means that you have to repeatedly vaccinate for leptospirosis in order to maintain immunity. Repeated vaccination of course increases the chances there will be an adverse reaction.

Fifth, while vaccination can prevent clinical disease in a vaccinated dog, it does not prevent the dog from becoming a carrier.

Which brings me to my sixth and biggest problem with lepto vaccination. Since there is no cross-protection among serovars, and immunity is temporary, you always have to assume that a dog, vaccinated or not, might have lepto if the symptoms indicate it. It takes a couple of weeks to get the results of a lepto test, so you have to treat the dog based on symptoms and can't just test first. So even if you vaccinate your dog, you may end up having to treat him or her for lepto anyway, and the dog may or may not have it. It kind of takes away the main reason that we vaccinate our dogs, ie, peace of mind and freedom from worry about a certain disease.

People need to be extremely aware of the symptoms of lepto and treat it aggressively from the very first suspicion that it's lepto, regardless of the vaccination status of the dog, and long before the diagnostic test results are known - if you wait that long, it may well be too late. Caught early, nearly all lepto can be treated with antibiotics. Caught late, many dogs will die, or require costly and mostly unavailable dialysis to survive.

I don't think that routinely vaccinating a dog for those four serovars of lepto annually or even more often makes a great deal of sense for most dogs. However, if there is a known outbreak, you know the serovar, and there's a vaccine for it, then you may want to consider it. Lepto does infect humans, so it's often a reportable disease, so your local public health department might be able to tell you if there is an outbreak. Beyond that, word of mouth among dog owners and at the vet's office is your best early warning system.

There is more information on leptospirosis on VeterinaryPartner.com.

THE PET HEALTH LIBRARY

  
 Wendy C. Brooks, DVM, DipABVP 
Educational Director, VeterinaryPartner.com

 Vaccination Options

Vaccination against at least two of the four serovars mentioned is commonly included in the basic distemper shot (DHLPP - the “L” stands for leptospirosis). The vaccine can be made up to omit the leptospirosis portion. Of all the sera in this basic vaccine, it seems to be the leptospirosis portion that has been associated with hives, facial swelling, and even life-threatening vaccination reactions much more than any of the other fractions.

FOR MORE DETAILS VISIT THE SITE BELOW:

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&S=0&C=0&A=573

 http://www.2ndchance.info/leptospirosis.htm

 

PLEASE RESEARCH BEFORE GIVING THIS VACCINE -  If you decide to have leptospirosis vaccine administered to your pet, have it given as an independent injection, and not in a combination vaccine or multiple vaccines given on the same day. First get your dog immunized against parvo and distemper virus. Then let several weeks pass before the leptospirosis vaccination.

BELOW INFORMATION IS FROM A DOG FORUM - OWNERS DISCUSSING WHETHER OR NOT TO GIVE THE VACCINE.

http://www.dogforums.com/dog-health-questions/12573-you-giving-your-puppy.html

 

 

Aspiration Pneumonia

 

Please read this article - it could save your Boxers life.

 Believe it or not, a quite common cause of aspiration pneumonia is faulty administration of liquid medication either administered by drench (drench is when a stomach tube is passed down the back of the throat), or by a dose syringeAny liquid that's given via syringe, whether medication or food, must not be given any faster than the animal can swallow, or the risk of aspiration pneumonia becomes very real.


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